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CONCERT REVIEW: YEEZUS TOUR (LA) *You Can Bet Your Bottom Dollar*

The Life As Shay Report:
 
We are here with the official concert review of Yeezus (The 2nd LA show) at the Los Angeles Staples Center that took place last night. 
 
This is my diary of events…
As we all know, the first thing you do after getting your ticket for a concert is find a look for the concert. I initially pulled inspiration from Kanye with black, leather sweatpants and a bleach-design tiger t-shirt with a male fit. But the day before the concert I ended up at the Compton Swap Meet and things turned “West-Coast” real fast…I ended up with a red leather cap, a NWA “America’s Most Wanted” tee and black liquid leather skirt. So with that out the way, I was ready for the concert. I didn’t know what to expect so I made sure that I went to church that Sunday before…what with all the talk of “Jesus” coming out on stage and all the insinuated biblical references and claims, I needed protection.  
The Show
 
Arrived at the venue around 7:15p, got settled in, buzzed around and waited for the first act to emerge. To my fond surprise Kendrick Lamar popped right out! No show openers, no build-up…just “POP!”
I’ve seen Kendrick perform a few times but this was the best. He has grown as a performer to a level that will soon demand him being the headliner ONLY. The cinematography used for his background visuals were breathtaking. They used original raw footage, even some home family videos. For Swimming Pools in particular, he released footage of female family members pouring and drinking champagne…fast cuts to youth walking the streets of Compton, shots of gang members…he went there! 
It was literally the movie to the Good Kid, M.A.A.D City album-the condensed version. 
 
He had a live band and raw emotions to share. I do believe that alot of people were floored by his delivery….and all I’m thinkn is “yeaaa buddy!” 
 
 
 
One of the most memorable moments was Kendrick’s performance of Sing About Me… He named his fallen homies that had passed in the streets of Compton (well over 5) and commenced to “Sing About Them.” Kendrick shouted out his Bishop right before sharing that he had been saved the week before. Raw, raw emotion, cracked voice and what appeared to be tears signaled the wrap up of his set. And you can bet your bottom dollar they were calling him #KingKendrick when he left the stage.  
Continued…
After a somewhat lengthy intermission out came Kanye “Yeezus” West. Again, no introduction, no build up, just the drop of the Yeezus track and out came 12 models dressed in clerical attire and faces covered with stoking caps (representative of the 12 Disciples? Most likely). Kanye‘s set gave off a very spiritual vibe (of what origin those spirits emerged is debatable) with a mountain on the stage and heavy catholic religion influence. Kanye performed 90% of his set with a face covered by an assortment of bedazzled masks. This came as a great disappointment to me. This was my first time seeing him perform and to miss the human interaction of watching someone’s facial expressions and feeling their emotions through their eyes and moving lips was lackluster. 
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The theatrics of it all was spellbonding but the actual performance was less than expected. However, you have never seen a show like this before and you can bet your bottom dollar that. I don’t think a rapper has treaded these waters of high conceptual sets and concert experiences like this before. 
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The excitement, for me, came during the last leg of his set when he removed his mask and performed songs from previous albums (ie. All of the Lights). He had the crowd jumping during the last 30 minutes, needless to say some concert-goers didn’t make it to the end of the show. If you are spiritually unstable, this may not be the show for you. If you do not like the album Yeezus, this may not be the show for you (considering that he performed damn near the entire album during this set). 

All in all, I am glad that I had the experience and learned more about two of the top game-changers in the game today. I could have lived without a “faux Jesus” coming on stage–this show it’s for everybody.